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Imagery made by Dr. Gianluca Catanzariti from 3D GeoImaging using the IDS Stream Multichannel GPR and GPR-SLICE.
Imagery made by Dr. Gianluca Catanzariti from 3D GeoImaging using the IDS Stream Multichannel GPR and GPR-SLICE.
Earth Measurement Corporation (www.EMCgeophysics.com) recorded this GPR-SLICE image to map subsurface utilities in Austin Texas.  The used sufficient density of lines to clearly show depth slices with many intersecting and meandering utilities.
Earth Measurement Corporation (www.EMCgeophysics.com) recorded this GPR-SLICE image to map subsurface utilities in Austin Texas. Profiles were collected in both X and Y direction and had sufficient density to clearly show depth slices with many intersecting and meandering utilities.
Ervan Garrison from the Geology and Geophysics department at the University of Georgia Athens, processed this GPR data collect at a Chrokee Nation cemetery site in Okahoma.  The site had been completely "erased" by farmers and was relocated along with historic structures that were built by Principal Chief John Ross in the late 1840s
Ervan Garrison from the Geology and Geophysics department at the University of Georgia Athens, processed this GPR data collect at a Chrokee Nation cemetery site in Okahoma. The site had been completely "erased" by farmers and was relocated along with historic structures that were built by Principal Chief John Ross in the late 1840s.
Hiromi Hamajima of Naeva Geophysics (www.naevageophysics.com) recorded data using a Sensors and Software Conquest system to map a rebar mesh in concrete.  The images were generated using XY decoupled gridding with X and Y data independently generated with differential search interpolation.  The separated X and Y grids were added back with grid math to clearly show the mesh structure
Hiromi Hamajima of Naeva Geophysics (www.naevageophysics.com) recorded data using a Sensors and Software Conquest system to map a rebar mesh in concrete. The images were generated using XY decoupled gridding with X and Y data independently generated with differential search interpolation. The separated X and Y grids were added back with grid math to clearly show the mesh structure.
Magnus Larson from WSP Civils in Sweden (www.wspgroup.se) generated these images showing several different densities of rebar in concrete .  The radar profiles were collected in x and y directions at 10cm intervals and then processed using XY decoupled gridding options in GPR-SLICE to better enhance linear features parallel to the radar profile lines.
Magnus Larson from WSP Civils in Sweden (www.wspgroup.se) generated these images showing several different densities of rebar in concrete . The radar profiles were collected in x and y directions at 10cm intervals and then processed using XY decoupled gridding options in GPR-SLICE to better enhance linear features parallel to the radar profile lines.
Swamp Kauri logs which can date from 18000-20000 years old are found buried beneath farmland by Matt Watson at Scantec in New Zealand (www.scantec.co.nz).  GPR/GPS surveys are done with a 200 MHz towed antenna.  A real time GPS track display is used to insure that there are no gaps in the area coverage of the site.  There wood from the Kauri logs are used in climatology studies and also have a strong market for coffin construction in China
Swamp Kauri logs which can date from 18000-20000 years old are found buried beneath farmland by Matt Watson at Scantec in New Zealand (www.scantec.co.nz). GPR/GPS surveys are done with a 200 MHz towed antenna. A real time GPS track display is used to insure that there are no gaps in the area coverage of the site. There wood from the Kauri logs are used in climatology studies and also have a strong market for coffin construction in China.
GPR-SLICE Software was enhanced in May of 2013 to process survey areas of any size.   Recently, a 12 hectare site  (430 m horizontally and 360 m verticall) measured with an IDS Stream Multichannel system to detect archaeological targets was made by Gianluca Catanzariti of GeoStudi (www.geoastier.com).  The site, commisioned by Juerg Leckebusch of SMT SwissMains GmbH  in Switzerland, had the 9200 radargram dataset processed via complete batch operations in 15 hours.
GPR-SLICE Software was enhanced in May of 2013 to process survey areas of any size. Recently, a 12 hectare site (430 m horizontally and 360 m verticall) measured with an IDS Stream Multichannel system to detect archaeological targets was made by Gianluca Catanzariti of GeoStudi (www.geoastier.com). The site, commisioned by Juerg Leckebusch of SMT SwissMains GmbH in Switzerland, had the 9200 radargram dataset processed via complete batch operations in 15 hours.
Texas A&M University in collaboration with the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) are utilizing GPR to evaluate root biomass in wheat breeding populations. The application of remote sensing technologies, in particular GPR, is aimed at allowing breeders to rapidly phenotype and select optimal root biomass and structure allowing a plant breeder to screen larger populations while decreasing cost and error.Graduate student Sean M. Thompson is using GPR to collecting data at CIMMYT’s Norman E. Borlaug Experiment Station in Ciudad Obregón, Sonora, Mexico. This research collaboration (Dirk B. Hays of Texas A&M University and Matthew Reynolds of CIMMYT Wheat Physiology) aims to evaluate the use of GPR to quantify root biomass.
Texas A&M University in collaboration with the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) are utilizing GPR to evaluate root biomass in wheat breeding populations. The application of remote sensing technologies, in particular GPR, is aimed at allowing breeders to rapidly phenotype and select optimal root biomass and structure allowing a plant breeder to screen larger populations while decreasing cost and error.Graduate student Sean M. Thompson is using GPR to collecting data at CIMMYT’s Norman E. Borlaug Experiment Station in Ciudad Obregón, Sonora, Mexico. This research collaboration (Dirk B. Hays of Texas A&M University and Matthew Reynolds of CIMMYT Wheat Physiology) aims to evaluate the use of GPR to quantify root biomass.
This GPR-SLICE image of support systems in a historic wall at a building in Barcelona was recorded by Roger Sala at SOT Prospection (www.sotprospection.com).
This GPR-SLICE image of support systems in a historic wall at a building in Barcelona was recorded by Roger Sala at SOT Prospection (www.sotprospection.com).
 Tree root and biomass measurement with GPR is becoming a common application.  Shown in this diagram are tree roots collected at a site by IGM of Germany.  The image processed by Alex Novo (www.gpr-slice.es) was made from direct compilation of hi density lines collected at 10 cm and interpolated to generate cells at 5cm.
Tree root and biomass measurement with GPR is becoming a common application. Shown in this diagram are tree roots collected at a site by IGM of Germany. The image processed by Alex Novo (www.gpr-slice.es) was made from direct compilation of hi density lines collected at 10 cm and interpolated to generate cells at 5cm.
This image made by Jessica Ogden with the University of Southampton, is from the Portus archaeological project near Fumicino airport in Rome.  The ancient Roman port is currently under excavation in conjunction with the British School of Archaeology Roma.  For more information please contact the University of Southampton website www.southampton.ac.uk/archaeology/
This image made by Jessica Ogden with the University of Southampton, is from the Portus archaeological project near Fumicino airport in Rome. The ancient Roman port is currently under excavation in conjunction with the British School of Archaeology Roma. For more information please contact the Unviersity of Southampton websitewww.southampton.ac.uk/archaeology/
In these images made by researchers Joe Boyce and his grad student Nicole Fallon at McMaster University, a pulse volume was made at a site to measure glaciofluvial gravel deposits, which is being considered as a possible artificial water recharge location. GPR is being used to image the internal architecture and thickness of the gravels.    The pulse volume was generated via decoupled gridding where the transverse search radius to the profile direction was 4 times longer than the in-line direction.  Interpolated pulse amplitudes made at 1 sample thick slices were used compile the volume.
In these images made by researchers Joe Boyce and his grad student Nicole Fallon at McMaster University, a pulse volume was made at a site to measure glaciofluvial gravel deposits, which is being considered as a possible artificial water recharge location. GPR is being used to image the internal architecture and thickness of the gravels. The pulse volume was generated via decoupled gridding where the transverse search radius to the profile direction was 4 times longer than the in-line direction. Interpolated pulse amplitudes made at 1 sample thick slices were used compile the volume.
GPR surveys were conducted at the Palo Alto Battlefield as part of Steve DeVores's NPS Archaeological Prospection Workshop .   Over 2 hectares of single channel data were painstakingly collected over a weeks field work.  Reflections related to the Mexican-American war emplacements are being studied
GPR surveys were conducted at the Palo Alto Battlefield as part of Steve DeVores's NPS Archaeological Prospection Workshop . Over 2 hectares of single channel data were painstakingly collected over a weeks field work. Reflections related to the Mexican-American war emplacements are being studied.
High frequency antenna were recently employed on historical buildings in Barcelona to discover hidden contruction features important for restoration.  This GPR wall survey to describe the iron structures at the Barcelona St. Pau Hospital was made by Roger Sala of SOT Prospeccio.  (Images presented at the kind permission of SAPIC).
High frequency antenna were recently employed on historical buildings in Barcelona to discover hidden contruction features important for restoration. This GPR wall survey to describe the iron structures at the Barcelona St. Pau Hospital was made by Roger Sala of SOT Prospeccio. (Images presented at the kind permission of SAPIC).
This image was made by Gianluca Catanzariti at the University of Complutense Madrid, Spain.  The radargrams and time slies are overlaid with real time interpretive graphics in the Open GL Volume menu
This image was made by Gianluca Catanzariti at the University of Complutense Madrid, Spain. The radargrams and time slices are overlaid with real time interpretive graphics in the Open GL Volume menu.
Shown is an image  from the Google Earth KMZ GPR-SLICE output option.  In this deep time slice image from Bibb County, AL, an ancient streambed is shown as high amplitude GPR reflections.  The GPR data was layered over a Google Earth georeferenced aerial photograph taken during the initial portion of the site's mitigation.  Excavations revealed continuous occupation dating from the Archaic Period in North America (8000 BC - 1000 BC).   (Data courtesy of Lee Harrison, PanAmerican Consultants www.panamconsultants.com)
Shown is an image from the Google Earth KMZ GPR-SLICE output option. In this deep time slice image from Bibb County, AL, an ancient streambed is shown as high amplitude GPR reflections. The GPR data was layered over a Google Earth georeferenced aerial photograph taken during the initial portion of the site's mitigation. Excavations revealed continuous occupation dating from the Archaic Period in North America (8000 BC - 1000 BC). (Data courtesy of Lee Harrison, PanAmerican Consultants www.panamconsultants.com)
Lee Harrison at PanAmerican Consultants (www.panamconsultants.com) recorded this image in July 2010 using the new KMZ Google Earth option in the GPR-SLICE 2D Time Slice menu.   Lost utilities and leftover foundations from an older building were identified using Overlay Analysis to combine time slice images over a larger depth range.
Lee Harrison at PanAmerican Consultants (www.panamconsultants.com) recorded this image in July 2010 using the new KMZ Google Earth option in the GPR-SLICE 2D Time Slice menu. Lost utilities and leftover foundations from an older building were identified using Overlay Analysis to combine time slice images over a larger depth range.
These GPR-SLICE images of destroyed Roman ruins beneath the Carnumtum site in Austria were recorded by the Swedish GPR manufacturer Radarteam (www.radarteam.se.   Data and photo courtesy of Per Wikstrom).
These GPR-SLICE images of destroyed Roman ruins beneath the Carnumtum site in Austria were recorded by the Swedish GPR manufacturer Radarteam (www.radarteam.se. Data and photo courtesy of Per Wikstrom).
Document
A Chieftain’s Hall or a Grave; Ground Penetrating Radar in an Archaeological Geophysics Survey to Target the Excavation of a Cropsmark near Stiklestad, Nord-Trondelag, Norway, by Kevin Barton, Lars Stenvik & Brynja Birgisdottir.
Kevin Barton from Earthsound Associates with colleagues from the National University of Science and Technology presented this work at the 5th International Conference on Advanced Ground Penetrating Radar in Granada Spain in 2009. This work details a possible destroyed grave that could have been re-used as a foundation for a Chieftain's Hall. The top slice shows well defined modern agricultural cultivation. The middle and lower time slices show possible features that can be related to the destroyed Chieftain Hall and a grave. The bottom most slice shows a possible cluster of stones that may be at the base of a destroyed chamber. The complete paper on this archaeological geophysics study can be downloaded at the link above.
Kevin Barton from Earthsound Associates with colleagues from the National University of Science and Technology presented this work at the 5th International Conference on Advanced Ground Penetrating Radar in Granada Spain in 2009. This work details a possible destroyed grave that could have been re-used as a foundation for a Chieftain's Hall. The top slice shows well defined modern agricultural cultivation. The middle and lower time slices show possible features that can be related to the destroyed Chieftain Hall and a grave. The bottom most slice shows a possible cluster of stones that may be at the base of a destroyed chamber. The complete paper on this archaeological geophysics study can be downloaded at the link above.
Dr. Hyun dok Oh, from the Korean National Institute for Cultural Properties, recorded this image from the Wolseong Fortress. Wolseong was a former historic capital and lasted from 57 BC to 935 AD. Dr. Oh was able to record GPR at 50 centimeter spacing over an area of 112,500 square meters!! His imaging is the largest single gridded dataset ever undertaken in Asia and also may be among the largest sites ever attempted to image with GPR in the world. He was able to solve all the mosaic noises between the different data blocks and he was able to merge all the data into a single gridded file!!
Dr. Hyun dok Oh, from the Korean National Institute for Cultural Properties, recorded this image from the Wolseong Fortress. Wolseong was a former historic capital and lasted from 57 BC to 935 AD. Dr. Oh was able to record GPR at 50 centimeter spacing over an area of 112,500 square meters!! His imaging is the largest single gridded dataset ever undertaken in Asia and also may be among the largest sites ever attempted to image with GPR in the world. He was able to solve all the mosaic noises between the different data blocks and he was able to merge all the data into a single gridded file!!
Shown in this GPR-SLICE image example is a horizon slice made through a 3D volume using the new “H” button.  Here, the horizon is the surface of the desert pavement under six meters of sand dunes at an archaeological site in the United Arab Emirates.  The pavement is shown to be fairly level after topographic corrections are made. The surfaces of buried dunes can be seen in the radargrams and the vertical time slices. (Image courtesy of Jason Herrmann at the University of Arkansas).
Shown in this GPR-SLICE image example is a horizon slice made through a 3D volume using the new “H” button. Here, the horizon is the surface of the desert pavement under six meters of sand dunes at an archaeological site in the United Arab Emirates. The pavement is shown to be fairly level after topographic corrections are made. The surfaces of buried dunes can be seen in the radargrams and the vertical time slices. (Image courtesy of Jason Herrmann at the University of Arkansas).
Land Air Surveying in Georgia http://www.landairsurveying.com/3d_laser_imaging.aspx and Underground Imaging Solutions (www.undergroundis.com) are now using GPR-SLICE exported 3D volumes and merging them with their proprietary 3D laser scaning images.
Land Air Surveying in Georgia http://www.landairsurveying.com/3d_laser_imaging.aspx and Underground Imaging Solutions (www.undergroundis.com) are now using GPR-SLICE exported 3D volumes and merging them with their proprietary 3D laser scaning images.
James Addock, John Gator, and Chris Gaffney of GSB prospection (www.gsbprospection.com) in the UK, made these GPR-SLICE images of the garden at Windsor Palace. The results of the survey was part of a Time Team production, which is a popular worldwide program which regularly uses remote sensing to solve archaeological problems. The images show shallow and deeper structures which may be related to remnant foundations from previous buildings that once adorned the site. The complete discussion of the GPR findings can be viewed at http://www.channel4.com/history/microsites/B/big_royal_dig/index.html.
Bob McCullough and Andrew White of the Indiana-Purdue University, Archaeological Survey, recorded this image at the Strawtown site north of Indianapolis. The squarish anomalies are Indian house floors dating back 800 or more years ago. The data was recorded at 0.5 meter profile spacing with a 400 MHz antenna.
Dan Elliott from the Lamar Institute in Georgia, recorded this data at the Ossabaw Barrier Island, in search of subsurface structures associated with tabby slave quarters. This large scale survey was comprised of 58 separate grid blocks which were all automatically adjusted for mosaic noises to create this comprehensive image.
Radar Solutions International (www.radar-solutions.com) created this image of the Great Hall located in Massachusetts. Conduit locations within a concrete floor were effectively mapped using GPR-SLICE software.
Jay Johnson, Professor of Anthropology & Sociology at the University of Mississippi, and his group of students surveyed a site on Sapelo Island. The GPR-SLICE images show circular features on the shallow time slices and deeper subsurface features of a shell mound. Modern utilities traversing the site were also discovered and mapped.
Brian Haley, a graduate student working with Professor Jay Johnson, recently applied the new static correction feature in GPR-SLICE Software for a radargram taken across the Sapelo Island shell mound in Georgia. The radargram shows topographic correction plus the additional correction that accounts for the tilt of the antenna. The radargram has a background removal filter and a hilbert transform applied to the data. The location of the shell mound is clearly identified in the processed radargram.
Dr. John Steinberg and Dr. Brian Damiata of the Cotsen Institute at UCLA head a joint project in Glaumbaer, Iceland to uncover the remains of Viking Age long houses. The long houses, which are made of turf, are detectable on GPR surveys conducted in mid July 2005. Data were collected with various antenna, and overlays of time slices in both x and y directions were used in the imaging turf walls. A complete story is given by Nancy Marie Brown from Penn State (http://www.rps.psu.edu/iceland/index.html).
Doria Kutrubes of Radar Solutions Internation (www.Radar-Solutions.com) is shown preparing for a GPR-GPS survey at the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. Over five hectares were surveyed in and around mesquite, yucca trees, and a variety of other natural plant life which is protected. The only way to properly expedite the survey was to employ GPS navigation. A GPR-SLICE image from one site is shown.