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Visit the GPR-SLICE Facebook group for an active forum on software operations
Visit the GPR-SLICE Facebook group for an active forum on software operations
GPR-SLICE imaging of post tension cables in concrete with rebar
GPR-SLICE imaging of post tension cables in concrete with rebar
GPR-SLICE real time topography adjustments in OpenGL
GPR-SLICE real time topography adjustments in OpenGL
 GPR-SLICE provides for Google Earth KMZ time slice image output.  In this Google Earth image, Kofun burial mounds located in Saitobaru, Miyazaki Japan are shown.  Some of the strong reflections repressent intact subterranean burial chambers.  (Data courtesy of Hongo Hiromichi and Higashi Noriaki, curator at the Saitobaru Archaeological Museum)
GPR-SLICE provides for Google Earth KMZ time slice image output. In this Google Earth image, Kofun burial mounds located in Saitobaru, Miyazaki Japan are shown. Some of the strong reflections repressent intact subterranean burial chambers. (Data courtesy of Hongo Hiromichi and Higashi Noriaki, curator at the Saitobaru Archaeological Museum)
GPR-SLICE example of shaded color option for time slice displays to provide artificial relief
GPR-SLICE example of shaded color option for time slice displays to provide artificial relief
GPR-SLICE has new options to make vector imaging easy to orient a 3D radar survey made on the surface of any geometry.  In this example surveying the walls inside a room can be easily set with a one button navigation operation.
GPR-SLICE has new options to make vector imaging easy to orient a 3D radar survey made on the surface of any geometry. In this example surveying the walls inside a room can be easily set with a one button navigation operation.
GPR-SLICE new menu to do vector addition of local volumes into a vector volume.  The new menu can synthesize a single vector volume for volumes taken on the surface of a square column.  (data courtesy of Geomaster Corp, Philippines)
GPR-SLICE new menu to do vector addition of local volumes into a vector volume. The new menu can synthesize a single vector volume for volumes taken on the surface of a square column. (data courtesy of Geomaster Corp, Philippines)
GPR-SLICE has options to generate solid pulse volumes for non multichannel users when a high profile density is used.  Pulse imaging can have advantages over amplitude/envelope imaging for some sites and as shown in an example provided by Horsley Archaeological LLC, Illinois.  In the example some faint ciricular features shown in pulse imaging illuminate a rampart from an Indian village - but not seen in typical envelop/amplitude imaging.
GPR-SLICE has options to generate solid pulse volumes for non multichannel users when a high profile density is used. Pulse imaging can have advantages over amplitude/envelope imaging for some sites and as shown in an example provided by Horsley Archaeological Prospection LLC, Illinois. In the example some faint ciricular features shown in pulse imaging illuminate a rampart from an Indian village - but not seen in typical envelop/amplitude imaging.
Recommended reading for beginners in GPR surveying
Recommended reading for beginners and advanced surveyors involved in GPR exploration http://www.amazon.com/Remote-Sensing-Archaeology-Geotechnologies-Environment/dp/3642318568

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GPR-SLICE
(c)
  v7.0 Ground Penetrating Radar Imaging Software

GPR-SLICE V7.0 (1994-2017)  is a comprehensive ground penetrating radar imaging software designed for creation of 2D/3D subsurface images for use in a variety of geotechnical, engineering and archaeological applications.    
GPR-SLICE began development in 1990 and became a full commercial software by 1994.   GPR-SLICE and GPRSIM for DOS were marketed by Geophysical Survey Systems Inc from 1994-1998.  The Geophysical Archaeometry Laboratory re-developed the software in the Windows environment in 2001 and has continually improved and updated the software primarily on user requests.   The software is directly marketed by the Geophysical Archaeometry Laboratory Inc. and our affliated  distributors in Germany, France, Spain, China Australia and Korea.

GPR-SLICE is compatible with all the major manufacturers of GPR including:  
      Geophysical Survey Systems Inc  
      Mala Geoscience
      Sensors and Software
      IDS 
      US Radar
      Ditch Witch
      ERA Technology
      3D Radar of Norway
      UTSI Electronics
      Geoscanners
      Leica
      Zond Radar
      Koden Radar
      GeoTech
      Transient Technologies
      Loza
      SEGY and SEG 2 
      Plus customized formats for research radar systems

GPR-SLICE multi-channel extended licenses include integration of:
     IDS Stream Italy
     Mala Mira Sweden
     3D Radar Geoscope Norway
     UTSI UK
     Koden Radar Japan
     Isung Korea
     Impulse Radar Sweden
     Radar Portal Australia
     Terravision USA
     *** with complete integration of GPS and total station 
   
 
GPR-SLICE applies a unique process of radargram desampling/binning and then recreates GPR data volumes using estimation algorithmsfor single channel - coarsely spaced profile lines.   For multi-channel dataset direct compilation to pulse 3D volumes can be quickly generated without interpolation because of the hi-density acquisition.   GPR-SLICE handles all surveyed data densities to make the most comprehensive subsurface imagery.    Many researchers have migrated to the software because of the professional quality images that can be created in the software. 
GPR-SLICE software is designed to remove line noises and artifiacts that show profile directions and pixelation noises from incomplete sampling of the ground. 
GPR-SLICE images help interpreters extract hidden information contained in noisy radargrams which would otherwise be lost and never revealed within the raw data.  

Many options in GPR-SLICE
set it apart from manufacturers imaging solutions.  GPR-SLICE was the first commericial software in 2003 to release complete integration with GPS navigation, including GPR/GPS volume imaging and time slices.  The software is completely integrated for GPS with all the major manufacturers of GPR.  GPR-SLICE is also already integrated for Total Station navigation where the typical GPS NMEA string formats are used.    
GPR-SLICE  was also the first software to provide for static corrections that account for the tilt of the antenna over sites with topography.  GPR-SLICE has a unique overlay option, which provides for comprehensive subsurface maps that synthesizes structures located at different depth levels.  Civil engineers that are surveyors of infrastructure can use features in GPR-SLICE to image tunnels and present 3D slices of tunnel or cylindrical volumes.   With the addition of our built-in OpenGL 3D Modules GPR-SLICE Open GL Volume, real time flythroughs, real time isosurface rendering, transparency and fences yield dynamic displays of GPR-SLICE data volumes.  The GPR-SLICE includes built-in Open GL options for mixing of 3D time slice volumes,  isosurfaces, horizon surfaces with raw or processed radargrams in the same graphic dialog.  The latest release of GPR-SLICE has complete Vector navigation formats - random GPR tracks + the yaw, tilt and pitch of the antenna are all included in the most generalized navigation.   Vector navigation is all inclusive of the navigation for regular surveys, GPS, total station navigated surveys, any navigated survey - but with the antenna orientation.  What this means is that any survey of a GPR antenna in 3D space can be mapped and the radarscans projected into their proper location.  GPR-SLICE v7.0 is the first commercial software to provide for vector imaging. 

GPR-SLICE has been providing support in the software for 4D GPR monitoring.  GPR monitoring is fastly becoming an important market in GPR surveying to reoccupy sites and to determine the differences in time that have occurred.  GPR monitoring of runaways, railway systems, and other critical infrastructures are getting noticed by the engineering community.  GPR time slice differencing since 2003 and recently volume differencing for 4D measurements have become available in 2015.  

GPR-SLICE Software features:
    • 2D/3D time slices
    • 3D volume displays, Isosurface Rendering, Fence Plots
    • Vector Navigation
    •        Antenna yaw, pitch and roll used in projecting scans
    •        Longitudinal tunnel radar survey menu for automatic vector setting
    •        Radial tunnel survey menu for automatic vector setting
    •        Meandering track menu and automatic vector setting
    • Complete GPS Navigation Integration Including:
    •        GPS 2D/3D Time Slices
    •        GPS 2D/3D Radargram Displays
    •        Specialized menu for editting/filtering GPS fallout
    •        Batch GPS topography corrections
    •        Builtin UTM utility conversion
    •        Exportability to GIS (world file creation)
    •        Direct export to Google Earth (*.kmz image file creation
    •        Builtin GPS staggering/scan lag latency correction 
    •        Complete GPS integration
  •     Open GL Graphics
  •        2D surface displays and automatic animation creation
  •        Open GL 3D real time flythroughs, x, y, z, xy fence diagrams, isosurface rendering
  •        Open  GL 3D radargram displays, with pulse thresholding and automatic animation creation
  •        Open GL Object drawing for interpretation (pipes, rectangular volumes, spheres etc ) with DXF file creation
  • Cylinder volume warping for imaging tunnels
  • Exportable animation menu
  • Multi-threaded animation displays
  • Built-in macros for processing all the high frequency concrete scanning systems
  • Unique processes including Overlay Analysis
  • Split Screen Options: time slice to radargram anomaly comparison
  • Split Screen Options: radargram to time slice anomaly comparison
  • Static corrections for topography
  • Static corrections accounting for antenna tilt 
  • Horizon Detection and Mapping
  •        Automatic horizon detection
  •        Layer depth maps using variable layer velocities
  •        Horizon amplitude profiles and maps
  •        Horizon slicing in Open GL 3D Volume
  • Batch processing
  • Customizable multi-time slice and radargram displays
  • Easy grid connection and appending 
  • Specialized filters to automatically remove mosaic noises from multi-grid surveys 
  • Time slice differencing for GPR montioring - 4D surveys
  • Radargram differencing for GPR monitoring - 4D surveys
  • Volume differencing for GPR monitoring - 4D survyes
  • Signal Processing:
  •     FK Radargram filtering
  •     0ns scan-by-scan or 0ns line-by-line offset auto detection/editing of radargrams menu
  •     Migration with variable velocity profiles
  •     3D/2.5D migration
  •     Bandpass filtering and spectra menu
  •     Spectral whitening
  •     Deconvolution
  •     Hilbert Transform
  •     Boxcar smoothing
  •     Background removal
  •     Regain
  •     Radargram differencing
  •     Fast Fourier Transform - 2D spatial frequency time slice filtering menu
  • Image Processing
  •     Mosaic correction menu
  •     2D FFT grid filtering
  •     Overlay analysis
  •     Grid math
  • Individualized map transform controls
  • Radargram tunnel/cylinder warping
  • jpeg / bmp / dxf / kmz / jgw / bmw / png / pdf outputs
  • Importability and processing Magnetometer, Resistivity, EM data and any 2D/3D data.

Image synthesizing of GPR, Mag, Resistivity and EM using Overlay Analysis 

The complete list of government agencies, universities, engineering/geotechnical companies and private organizations currently subscribing or maintaining purchased licenses to
 GPR-SLICE Software for Windows in 2017 is:

      1. Saitobaru Archaeological Museum, Miyazaki, Japan
      2. United States Forest Service, Louisiana
      3. Nara National Research Institute for Cultural  Properties, Nara, Japan 
      4. National Park Service, Nebraska
      5. CNR National Laboratories, Italy
      6. National Institute for Cultural Properties, Korea
      7. University of Mississippi, Dept of Anthropology 
      8. University of Georgia, Dept of Geology/Geophysics 
      9. University of Alabama , Moundville
      10. Tenri University, Japan
      11. Spectrum Geophysics, California (www.spectrumgeophysics.com)
      12. Radar Solutions International, Massachusettes (www.radarsolutions.com)  
      13. Earth Measurement Corporation, Houston (www.emcgeophysics.com)  
      14. Cal State University Long Beach, Dept of Anthropology
      15. The Lamar Institute, Georgia  ( www.thelamarinstitute.org/
      16. SOT Prospeccio Arqueologica, Barcelona, Spain (www.sotprospection.com)
      17. Fiske Center for Archaeological Research, University of Massachusettes 
      18. GEOVision Geophysical Services, California (www.geovision.com)
      19. United States Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg MS
      20. ASM Affiliates, Carlsbad CA, (www.asmaffiliates.com)
      21. Brockington & Associates, South Carolina  (www.brockington.org)
      22. INSET s.r.o., Czech Republic
      23. Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon
      24. Dept of Geology, Wofford College, South Carolina
      25. Seminole Tribe of Florida
      26. Archaeo-Geophysical Association, Pheonix,  Arizona
      27. Posselt & Zickgraf Prospektionen, Germany (www.pzp.de)
      28. Department of Antiquities, Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany
      29. Dept of Geology, Southern Illinois University
      30. Radarteam, Sweden (www.radarteam.se)
      31. Universidad Politécnica de Cataluña, Barcelona, Spain
      32. Geophysics and Geology Branch, California Dept of Tranportation
      33. Museum of Anthropology, University of Kentucky
      34. Joanneum Research, Hydrogeology and Geophysics, Austria (www.joanneum.at)
      35. Department of Archaeology, Anthropology & Forensic Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Bournemouth Univeristy, UK
      36. Dept of Geology and Geophysics, University of Massachusetts
      37. The Leon Recanati Maritime Institute, University of Haifa, Israel
      38. Naeva Geophysics Inc., Charlottesville, Virginia (www.naevageophysics.com)
      39. Anthropology Department, Indiana University of Pennsylvania
      40. Enviroscan Inc., Pennsylvannia  (www.enviroscan.com)
      41. School of Humanities, University of South Hampton, UK
      42. Center for Near Surface Geophysics and Archaeological Prospection, Dokuz Eylul University, Turkey
      43. Responsible  Development, MDS, Paris (www.MDS-Paris.com)
      44. Historic Preservation Dept, Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma
      45. Panamerican Consultants, Georgia, (www.panamconsultants.com)
      46. On-Site GPR, Sacramento
      47. Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls
      48. Southeastern Archaeological Research Inc, Jonesville, Florida
      49. Munin spf., Faroe Islands
      50. Open Ground, South Africa (www.openground.co.za)
      51. GeoStudi, Livorno, Italy (www.geoastier.com)
      52. Copernico, S.r.l., Montalcino, Siena, Italy
      53. Archaeology Dept., University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
      54. Geophysics Unit, Orkney College, Scotland
      55. CAI Archaeometry and Analysis, University Complutense of Madrid, Spain
      56. GeoRadar Co., Ltd., Korea
      57. Laboratoire Central des Ponts et Chaussées, France
      58. Heritage Preservation and Interpretation Inc., Steamburg, New York
      59. Energy and Environment Research Laboratory, ITRI, Taiwan
      60. VISTA Centre, Birmingham Archaeology, University of Birmingham, UK (www.vista.bham.ac.uk)
      61. Geophysical Researchers Consulting, Bogota, Columbia (www.investigadoresgeofisica.com )
      62. Tecno  Terra, Jalisco, Mexico (www.georadarypolimeros.com)
      63. School of Geography and Earth Sciences, McMaster University, Canada
      64. Wood Inspection Services, Texas (www.WeInspectTexas.com)
      65. OYO Corporation, Japan
      66. Poyry Infra GmbH, Austria  (www.poyry-infra.at)
      67. Earth Science and Resource Engineering, CSIRO, Australia (www.csiro.au)
      68. Wessex Archaeology, UK
      69. Eggers Kampfmittelbergung GmbH, Hamburg, Germany, www.eggers-gruppe.de
      70. Alliance for Integrated Spatial Technologies, University of South FloridaPM
      71. Weston Solutions (www.westonsolutions.com)
      72. Maverick Inspection, Canada (www.maverickinspection.com)
      73. Subtronic Corporation, Martinez, California (www.subtronic.com)
      74. University Konstatina Filozofa, Slovakia
      75. TerraDat Ltd, United Kingdom (www.terradat.co.uk)
      76. Cultural Resource Analysts Inc., Lexington, Kentucky (www.crai-ky.com)
      77. The Chickasaw Nation, Oklahoma
      78. Central Florida Locators, Bushnell, Florida
      79. School of Social Studies, University of Queensland, Australia
      80. Adapis Georadar Teknik AB, Sweden
      81. Construction Solutions, Paola, Kansas (www.construction-solutions.com)
      82. Adojam, Kensington, Maryland
      83. Stratascan Ltd., Worcestershire, UK, (www.stratascan.co.uk)
      84. Ithaca College Physics, New York
      85. Korea Institute of Geological Environments, Gyeonggi-Do, Korea
      86. University of Pisa, Italy
      87. University of Bologna, Italy
      88. Geotec Engineering and Environmental Geophysics Ltd, Israel (www.geotec.co.il)
      89. Southeast Archaeological Center, National Park Service, Florida
      90. Kenaitze Indian Tribe, Alaska
      91. Geoscanners AB, Sweden (www.geoscanners.com)
      92. Geoscience Consulting LLC, Montgomery, Alabama (www.geoscienceconsulting.com)
      93. Dept of Geology and Environmental Sciences, College of Charleston, SC
      94. Geometrik Muhendislik, Turkey (www.geometrik-muhendislik.net)
      95. Baikal-Hokkaido Archaeology Project, University of Alberta, Canada
      96. Dept of Civill Engineering, The University of Hong Kong
      97. Rose Geophysical Consultants, Orkney, UK
      98. CTBTO Preparatory Commission Vienna, Austria
      99. Dept of Geoinfomatics, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University
      100. Round Rock Geophysics, Texas (www.roundrockgeo.com)
      101. Dept of Soil and Crop Sciences, Texas A&M University
      102. Dutch National Police Agency KLPD, Netherlands
      103. Geozone Asesores S.L., Valencia, Spain
      104. Structure Scan, Observatory, South Africa (www.structurescan.co.za)
      105. ScanTec Ltd, Wjamgareo. New Zealand (www.scantec.co.nz)
      106. Dept of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Temple University
      107. GEARH d.o.o., Slovenia
      108. Analyse Geophysique Conseil , France
      109. Ingenieurgesellschaft PTM Dortmund mbH, Germany
      110. WSP Civils, Sweden (www.wspgroup.se)
      111. Murphy Survey Ltd., Ireland (www.murphysurvey.ie)
      112. Dept of Anthropology, California State University Dominguez Hills
      113. Igienieria Insitu, s.l., A Coruna, Spain
      114. Dept of Anthropology, University of Georgia, Athens
      115. Dept of Geosciences, East Tennessee University
      116. Konstat biro d.o.o, Ljubljana
      117. Dept of Anthropology, University of Northern Colorado
      118. Nakano Technology Co., Ltd., Saitama, Japan
      119. Dudek and Associates, Encinitas, California (www.dudek.com)
      120. TAG Research by Sturm Inc, New Mexico (www.tagrsi.com)
      121. Buyeo National Research Institute of Cultural Heritage, Korea
      122. Bronx Community College, CUNY, New York
      123. 3DGeoimaging, Torino, Italy (www.3dgeoimaging.com)
      124. Dept of Anthropology, Washington University of St Louis, Missouri
      125. Pegasus Environmental, New York
      126. Hunter Geophysics, Australia (www.huntergeophysics.com)
      127. Dept of Archaeology, Waseda University, Japan
      128. Geoscan, Canada (www.geoscan.ca)
      129. Dept of Geography and Earth Science, Shippensburg University, Pennsylvania
      130. RPS Group, Queensland, Australia (www.rpsgroup.com)
      131. SC Gauss SRL, Romania
      132. United States Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha, Nebraska
      133. Sakurakoji Denki, Osaka, Japan
      134. Dept of Archaeology, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia
      135. Parsons Overseas (P) Limited, India
      136. National Forensic Service, Korea
      137. Center for Advanced Spatial Technologies, University of Arkansas
      138. Daeil Enc, Korea
      139. Murphy Surveys, United Kingdom
      140. Edenbros LLS, Saint James, Missouri
      141. Golder Associates Pty Ltd, Australia
      142. GPR Pro, UK
      143. Geomatic Solutions S.L.,Galicia, Spain
      144. Nanjing Hydraulic Research Institute, Jiangsu Province, China
      145. Dept of Civil Engineering, Chung Hua University, Taipei, Taiwan
      146. Reveal Infrastructure, New Zealand  (www.revealinfrastructure.co.nz)
      147. Dept of Geosciences, Mansfield University, Pennsylvania
      148. Target Geophysics, Belgium  (www.targetgeophysics.com)
      149. Korea Polar Research Institute
      150. Sambo GeoTek, Korea (www.geotek.co.kr)
      151. Coastal Environments Inc., New Orleans, Lousisiana (www.coastalenv.com)
      152. Lunate Consulting, Canada
      153. Keck Consulting Services, Battle Creek, Missouri
      154. U.S. Geological Survey, Eastern Geology and Paleoclimate Science Center, Virginia
      155. Draig Geoscience, Perth, Australia (www.draiggeoscience.com)
      156. Isung Industry Co. Ltd., Korea
      157. Walbridge Construction Co., Detroit, Michigan
      158. Fort Bend County Historical Commission, Texas
      159. Public Works Research Institute, Ibaraki, Japan
      160. Bureau of Cultural Heritage, Ministry of Culture, Taiwan
      161. Piotr Wroniecki, Warsaw, Poland
      162. Dept of Engineering, National Chiao  Tung University, Taiwan
      163. ELTA Systems Ltd, Israel
      164. GeoRadar Pty Ltd, Coffs Harbour Australia (www.georadar.com.au)
      165. Atlas Geophysical, United Kingdom
      166. GHD, Hobart Tasmania, Australia (www.GHD.com)
      167. Special Projects Inc., Calgary, Canada
      168. Terra Marine, Greece (www.terra-marine.gr)
      169. Sterling Geo, United Kingdom (www.sterlinggeo.com)
      170. Geomecca, Korea
      171. Logan Simpson Inc., Tempe, Arizona
      172. RADAR Geoservizi s.a.s., Torino, Italy
      173. United States Army Corps of Engineers, Sacramentro, California
      174. DB International GmbH, Bremen, Germany
      175. GHD, Perth, Australia (www.GHD.com)
      176. Geoprospect S.A. DE, C.V., Nuevo Leon, Mexico
      177. Round Rock Geophysics, Austin, Texas (www.RoundRockGeo.com)
      178. Michalis Poultsidis, Larisa, Greece
      179. ScanPlus Locating Ltd, Sooke, BC, Canada (www.scanplus.ca)
      180. French National Institute for Preventive Archaeology - INRAP
      181. School of Science and Technology, University of Camerino, Italy
      182. All GPR LLC, Fountain Hills, Arizona
      183. Glen Dash Foundation for Archaeological Research
      184. National Geographic Society, Washington D.C.
      185. ATS International Inc., Christiansburg, Virginia (www.ats-intl.com)
      186. Nordic Volcanology Center, Institute of Earth Sciences, University of Iceland
      187. Land and Marine Surveys, South Africa (www.lmsurveys.co.za)
      188. Sumet Yerbilimeri Ltd., Izmir, Turkey (www.sumet.com.tr)
      189. ESG Infrastructure Services, United Kingdom (www.esg.co.uk)
      190. National Park Service, Lowell, Massachusetts
      191. Dept of Anthropology, Texas State University
      192. Kawasaki Geological Engineering Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan
      193. Center for Northeast Asian Studies, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
      194. Geomaster Corporation, Quezon City, Philippines (www.geomastercorp.com)
      195. David Charles Nobes, New Zealand
      196. School of Arts and Communication, University of Southern Queensland, Australia
      197. Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute, Korea
      198. EGS (Asia) Limited, Hong Kong (www.egssurvey.com)
      199. G. I. Engineering Co., Ltd., Korea
      200. Department of Archaeology, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia
      201. Korean Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM)
      202. Ceratonia Geophysics S.r.l, Ragusa, Italy (www.ceratonia.it)
      203. Captial Normal University, China
      204. Serramur & Asociates, PC, Boone, North Carolina (www.seramur-associates.com)
      205. Proceq, Switzerland
      206. Seismic and Exploration Geophysics, University of Bassra, Iraq
      207. Dept of History, Geography and Philosophy, University of Cadiz, Spain
      208. Dept of Earth Sciences, University of Florence, Italy
      209. ScanTech Geoscience, Ireland
      210. Dept of Earth Sciences, University of Memphis, Tennessee
      211. Soft Options, New Zealand
      212. Gyula Forster National Centre for Cultural Heritage Management, Hungary
      213. Sum Kee Construction Limited, Hong Kong (www.sumkee.com.hk)
      214. Peter Lanzarone
      215. Jorge Alarcon Anthropologist, Bogota, Colombia
      216. Anomali Jeoteknik Muhendislik Hizm Ltd, Turkey (www.anomali.com.tr)
      217. GeoPat, France
      218. BHP Billiton, Canada
      219. Geoside Geofisica snc, Italy
      220. Higashi Nippon International University, Japan
      221. Institute of Archaeology, Monuments and Art History, University of Bamberg, Germany
      222. Phase One GPR, Florida
      223. Department of Geophysics Suleyman Demirel University, Turkey
      224. Impulse Radar, Sweden (www.impulseradar.se)
      225. Institute of Archaeology, University College London
      226. Stadt Essen, Amt duer Geoinformation, Germany
      227. Sherpa ENC co., ltd., Korea
      228. Taimyr Georadar, Norilsk, Russian Federation (www.norgeo.ru)
      229. Gel Geophysics, Charleston, South Carolina (www.gelgeophysics.com)
      230. Terracon, Oklahoma City, OK (www.terracon.com)
      231. Umut Basoglu, Turkey
      232. Precise Locating Service Inc., Altoona, Florida
      233. Dept of Geography and Anthropology, University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire
      234. Estudios Geofisico de Occidente, Mexico
      235. CDM Smith Consult GmbH, Stuttgart, Germany
      236. Wiley Geotechnical, Mangawhai, New Zealand (www.wileygeotechnical.co.nz)
      237. Newcrest Mining, Papau New Guinea
      238. Archaeological Prospection Servics of Southampton, Dept of Archeology, University of Southampton
      239. BE Surveys, Greenfields, Western Australia (www.besurveys.com.au)
      240. Concrete GPR LLC, Albany, Oregon (www.gprconrete.com)
      241. Power Tech Inc, Sequim, Washington (www.powertechvideo.com)
      242. Dept of Engineering Science, University of Auckland, New Zealand
      243. Florida Geological Survey, Tallahassee, Florida
      244. Earth Dynamics LLC, Portland, Oregon (www.earthdyn.com)
      245. Horsley Archaeological Prospection LLC, Dekalb, Illinois (www.archpros.com)
      246. Utility Mapping Services Inc, Helena, Montana (www.umsi.us)
      247. Tennessee Valley Archaeological Research, Huntsville, Alabama
      248. Southern Geophysical Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand
      249. Jason Hermann, Eberhard Karl University of Tubingen, Germany
      250. Dianex, France (www.dianex.fr)
      251. Dept of Geosciences, Austin Peay State University, Tennessee
      252. Bess Test Lab, Fresno, California (www.besstestlab.com)
      253. Reticulated Python Construction Inc, Ontario, Canada
      254. Dept of Historical Studies, Gothenburg University, Sweden
      255. National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, NIWA, New Zealand
      256. Earthscan Geoscience Ltd, British Columbia, Canada (www.earthscangeo.com)
      257. Ancient History and Archaeology, University of Leicester, United Kingdom
      258. GeoWave Solutions, Cumming, Georgia (www.geowavesolutions.com)


GPR-SLICE volume imaging with GPS navigation:   Mala Geoscience

GPR-SLICE Software - Fixing GPS Latency seen in GPR Time Slices :  example from a GSSI SIR 4000 (data courtesy of Ryan North, US Army Corps of Engineers)

GPR-SLICE volume imaging with GPS navigation:   Sensors and Softwares

GPR-SLICE volume imaging with GPS navigation:   GSSI

GPR-SLICE concrete imaging using XY decoupled gridding:

 
The GPR-SLICE Grid menu has been enhanced with FFT-2D time slice filtering. In the example seen, plow scars or crop noise at about 45 degrees to the grid is seen. Fast Fourier Transforming the image in 2 dimensions, the spatial frequency components of the crop noise can be identified as linear features normal to the crop lines. By selectiively blanking out the desired spatial frequency components and doing an inverse FFt on the time slice grid, the crop noise can be effectively filtered. (Data courtesy of the British School at Rome).
The GPR-SLICE Grid menu has been enhanced with FFT-2D time slice filtering. In the example seen, plow scars or crop noise at about 45 degrees to the grid is seen. Fast Fourier Transforming the image in 2 dimensions, the spatial frequency components of the crop noise can be identified as linear features normal to the crop lines. By selectiively blanking out the desired spatial frequency components and doing an inverse FFt on the time slice grid, the crop noise can be effectively filtered. (Data courtesy of the British School at Rome).
New OpenGL XYZ-2D menu in GPR-SLICE allows the user to click on time slice anomalies and to instantenously see the X and Y volume cuts.  IDS Stream multichannel was used during the workshop "GPR methods for Archaeology and Historical Buildings" and were collected in the Geophysical Test Site of ITABC National Research Area of CNR Roma1.  The site was surveyed by Gianfranco Morelli of Geostudi and processed in GPR-SLICE with multichannel options.  The software was recently enhanced to properly account for phase lag in GPS collection with this multichannel system to properly position all the individual channels.
New OpenGL XYZ-2D menu in GPR-SLICE allows the user to click on time slice anomalies and to instantenously see the X and Y volume cuts. IDS Stream multichannel was used during the workshop "GPR methods for Archaeology and Historical Buildings" and were collected in the Geophysical Test Site of ITABC National Research Area of CNR Roma1. The site was surveyed by Gianfranco Morelli of Geostudi and processed in GPR-SLICE with multichannel options. The software was recently enhanced to properly account for phase lag in GPS collection with this multichannel system to properly position all the individual channels.
GPR-SLICE v7.0 has a new bridgedeck module featuring an auto-hyperbola detection and mapping menu of recorded hyperbolas from bridgedecks or any subsurface structures with rebar or piping.  The auto-detetction algorithm allows the user to adjust threshold settings to selectively detect only the desired hyperbolic features.  An editting dialog allows the user to easily intervene and edit the detected features.Peak amplitude responses on the rebar hyperbola which are correlated with bridgedeck corrosion are gridded in the GPR-SLICE Grid menu.
GPR-SLICE v7.0 has a new bridgedeck module featuring an auto-hyperbola detection and mapping menu of recorded hyperbolas from bridgedecks or any subsurface structures with rebar or piping. The auto-detetction algorithm allows the user to adjust threshold settings to selectively detect only the desired hyperbolic features. An editting dialog allows the user to easily intervene and edit the detected features. Peak amplitude responses on the rebar hyperbola which are correlated with bridgedeck corrosion are gridded in the GPR-SLICE Grid menu.
The 2D Radar menu in GPR-SLICE lets the user display as many radargrams to the display dialog as they want.  Anomaly picking on any radargram shown to the screen is also easily launched in the menu
The 2D Radar menu in GPR-SLICE lets the user display as many radargrams to the display dialog as they want. Anomaly picking on any radargram shown to the screen is also easily launched in the menu.
A recent image by Xpresa Geophysics shows utility mapping capabilities in GPR-SLICE.  Data from an IDS Stream Multichannel  system supporting 24 channels separated 6cm apart shows connected utilities across a street in Barcelona Spain.   The data was processed by Miquel Coll using GPR-SLICE v7.0 with Multichannel Options.  Interpretation was made directly in the OpenGL Volume Draw menu in the software with utilities placed direclty on top of 3D slices in a real time environment.  The data were then exported to DXF in the software for import directly to AutoCAD.
A recent image by Xpresa Geophysics shows utility mapping capabilities in GPR-SLICE. Data from an IDS Stream Multichannel system supporting 24 channels separated 6cm apart shows connected utilities across a street in Barcelona Spain. The data was processed by Miquel Coll using GPR-SLICE v7.0 with Multichannel Options. Interpretation was made directly in the OpenGL Volume Draw menu in the software with utilities placed direclty on top of 3D slices in a real time environment. The data were then exported to DXF in the software for import directly to AutoCAD.
GPR-SLICE v7.0 is now equipped for automatic detecting up to 8 layers and outputting these layers for 3D imaging in Open GL.  These new features are useful for road evaluation surveys and geologic/stratigraphic mapping.  In addition to the horizon surfaces and profiles detected, horizon amplitudes are outputted for use in horizon slice mapping.   Road evaluation licenses also contain capabilities to calibrate layer dielectrics/velocities from layer reflections using metal plate calibration signals which are automatically integrated and used to calculate layer thicknesses.   The new CALTRANS (California Dept of Transportation) Standard format for road evaluations will be provided to authorized licenses.
GPR-SLICE v7.0 is now equipped for automatic detecting up to 8 layers and outputting these layers for 3D imaging in Open GL. These new features are useful for road evaluation surveys and geologic/stratigraphic mapping. In addition to the horizon surfaces and profiles detected, horizon amplitudes are outputted for use in horizon slice mapping. Road evaluation licenses also contain capabilities to calibrate layer dielectrics/velocities from layer reflections using metal plate calibration signals which are automatically integrated and used to calculate layer thicknesses. The new CALTRANS (California Dept of Transportation) Standard format for road evaluations will be provided to authorized licenses.
GPR-SLICE v7.0 now has complete Vector Radargram Imaging formats.  This is a the most generalized navigation formats which is inclusive of GPS, total station, any random track, but with the addition of antenna/radar scans vector in 3D space.  With the new 20 columns Vector-GPS formats, any orientation conceivable with GPR can be visualized in GPR-SLICE v6.0.
GPR-SLICE v7.0 has complete Vector Radargram Imaging formats! This is a the most generalized navigation formats which is inclusive of GPS, total station, any random track, but with the addition of antenna/radar scans vector in 3D space. With the new 20 columns Vector-GPS formats, any orientation conceivable with GPR can be visualized in GPR-SLICE v6.0.
GPR-SLICE v7.0 is equipped with Open GL Drawing Tools to assist the user in making interpretation of depth slices and volume images, in a real time - completely user controlled graphical enviornment.The latest version of GPR-SLICE also has DXF file creation of the drawn objects for import to AutoCAD software.
GPR-SLICE v7.0 is equipped with Open GL Drawing Tools to assist the user in making interpretations of depth slices and volume images, in a real time - completely user controlled graphical enviornment. The latest version of GPR-SLICE also has DXF file creation of the drawn objects for import to AutoCAD software.
Since 2003, GPR-SLICE Software was equipped for handling completely random GPS navigated surveys. Shown in the example is an image made from several GPS navigated radargrams. GPR-SLICE can handle up to 5000 GPS radargrams at a time to create subsurface images; or a single GPS radargram collected over an hour or more can also be used in volume images.  GPR-SLICE is integrated for GPS with all the major manufacturers: 1) for Sensors and Software, GPR-SLICE converts *.dt1.gps files and uses these for navigation tracks, 2) for GSSI GPR-SLICE reads the *.tmf files then extracts and converts the necessary synced information from the *.plt files and makes the necessary *.dzt.gps files, 3) for Mala GPR-SLICE reads the *.cor files, converts to UTM and makes the necessary *.rd3.gps for imaging.  For additional information on GPR-GPS imaging in GPR-SLICE Software see http://www.gpr-survey.com/gprslice2/gpsgprapplications.html
GPR-SLICE has a built-in GPS track filter menu for fixing GPS fallout and a variety of recording problems, in addition  to track smoothing routines.   The GPS radargram track can be displayed in Open GL that allow the user to include radargrams, time slices, horizon surfaces and topography - with capabilities to show any combination of desired datasets.
GPR-SLICE has a built-in GPS track filter menu for fixing GPS fallout and a variety of recording problems, in addition to track smoothing routines. The GPS radargram track can be displayed in Open GL that allow the user to include radargrams, time slices, horizon surfaces and topography - with capabilities to show any combination of desired datasets.
OpenGL 3D visualization menus in GPR-SLICE are equipped for transparency rendering.  In this example a raw radargram is interpreted for 2 utilities found at the site.
OpenGL 3D visualization menus in GPR-SLICE are equipped for transparency rendering. In this example a raw radargram is interpreted for 2 utilities found at the site.
GPR surveys were conducted jointly with Dr. Salvatore Piro of the Consiglio Nacionale delle Ricerche next to the Romaneque church of Santa Maria in Vescovio, Italy. GPR-SLICE subsurface images revealed many buried wall foundations. Helen Patterson at the British School of Archaeology in Rome believes the buried buildings to be portions of a Roman marketplace which initially began construction in the 1st century BC and flourished through the 4th century AD as the Roman town of the Forum Novum. Archaeologists were able to reconstruct the entire marketplace, including living quarters, storage areas, hallways and door entrances, all of which could be discerned from the radar images. The wall foundations begin at about 30 cm from the ground surface.
One area surveyed at the Villa of Roman Emperor Traianos revealed a large oval shaped structure. This is estimated by archaeologists to be a garden pond that was probably used for domesticating eels - eels that were incorporated into a fish sauce to be eaten by the emperor. The rectangular anomalies are believed to be military buildings on the villa premises. In the radar image other buildings colocated under the oval but weaker in reflected amplitude suggest that an earlier occupation of the site may have existed prior to the construction of Traianos' villa getaway. The 3D radar volume was created from radar profiles collected at 0.5m intervals.